Load a film fast and good

Load a film fast and good

So just how do you do it? Loading film on a manual camera is basically easy. All you need is plenty of concentration and focus and you are on your way to shooting the pictures you want and need.

The following are basic steps and tips on loading film on a manual camera.

First things first, it is best that the film you are loading is the type that is perfectly suited for your
camera. Determine the brand that works best for you as well as on your equipment. Try to search through and research the types of film you have seen developed. Do you like how they came out using that specific brand? If not, try to look at other types until you find the pictures that are colorful and that fits your taste.

Believe it or not, there are many different films to choose from. The most popular is Kodak, of course, as well as Fuji. There is also a type of film that provides black and white picture shots. The camera films available also have a range that offer a slow speed. There is an ISO film speed that is in the 100 while there is also a fast film speed of 400.

An ISO film that has a speed of 100 basically offers a picture that whould best be taken outdoors rather than indoors. Outdoor shots using this type of film are well lighted and bright. However, indoor shots that are taken on an ISO 100 film will turn out dark and blurry without the appropriate lighting and flash system. Also, an ISO 100 film when used to take shots where movement takes place, will basically not turn out good. Pictures taken using such a film will also appear blurry.

Meanwhile, an ISO 400 film offers the best option and shots whether outdoors, indoors, static shots, wide angle shots, or moving shots. An ISO 400 shot provides clear pictures.

Get ready to lock and load

Depending on the speed of the film you choose, set the ISO of your camera on the type of film speed you are loading. This could be done by adjusting the speed dial of your camera. Usually, this function is located on the left of the camera’s top. However, in some models, particularly Canon, the film speed adjustment is located on the right.

After adjusting, pull the tab of the film out of the film canister to about three inches. Then, open the camera’s back via pressing a release button located usually on the camera’s right side. For other types of camera, this release could be found and pressed at the camera’s left side.

Place the film on the available space on the left part of the camera’s inside. Don’t forget to place the film with the side that is flat facing you.

Later, the film should be pulled across the inside of the camera’s length in order to reach the right side of the camera’s spool. This is where the tab of the film is to be inserted into this spool and be winded manually, specifically counter clockwise or until this same film wraps itself around the spool.

Spooling a film on a camera that is automatic is a lot easier. You just close the camera’s back and press a small button, and viola, the camera spools the film by itself.

When the film has been loaded and spooled, close the camera’s back and let the film advance until the counter on the camera’s top reads 1. In other cameras, the counter could read the actual number of shots still available on the film.

Get ready to shoot and shoot and shoot

Now that the camera has been loaded with film, it is time to get ready and take those award winning shots. In manual cameras, it is best that the film be advanced immediately after a shot is taken. In automatic cameras, the film advances by itself.

However, be it a manual camera or an automatic, it is important that you check whether the film is advancing or not – or if you have advanced the film or not. If you fail to check, you might be shooting to your heart’s content and the pictures may not turn out the way you want.


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